Models Bella Williams, left, and Kristylove, graced the windows of the Kaimuki Goodwill store during its grand reopening celebration.

Models Bella Williams, left, and Kristylove, graced the windows of the Kaimuki Goodwill store during its grand reopening celebration.

Goodwill Kaimuki unveiled its new look March 31 after a makeover that is part of a rebranding campaign Goodwill Hawaii began in 2015.

Goodwill Hawaii worked with 50|50, a local creative agency, that incorporated elements like aloha shirts and other iconic Hawaii imagery into window displays, and introduced a brighter color palette. The new designs will also eventually be incorporated into all of Goodwill Hawaii’s program locations, donation centers, and stores on Oahu, Maui, the Big Island and Kauai.

Those shopping will find premium merchandise in a window at the front of the store, where manikin displays by Amanda Stevens and Rene Rodriguez often started fights for the pieces when they came off the manikins the first Sunday of the month. Now people simply cue up the morning after in hope of snagging one of the coveted pieces.

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation was credited for providing much of the funding for the makeover.

To celebrate the store’s new look, special offers, discounts and prize giveaways will be available to shoppers who visit the Kaimuki location through April 3.

Pastor Ron Arnold from Kaimuki Christian Church made the opening remarks at the unveiling, reminding everyone of Goodwill’s history, started in 1902 by Boston Rev. Edgar J. Helms, a Methodist minister who turned out to be what we call today a social innovator.

He collected used items from the wealthy, repairing them for use by the less fortunate, then training those in need to mend and repair, resulting, Arnold said, with “not a hand-out, but a hand up.”

Guests were treated to plenty of pupu and a performance by the Goodwill Signing Stars, comprising participants from the Hoolana Program for Adults with Disabilities.

Guests were treated to plenty of pupu and a performance by the Goodwill Signing Stars, comprising participants from the Hoolana Program for Adults with Disabilities.

With community support, Goodwill continues to help people who have barriers to employment. In addition to reclaiming and restoring goods, he said, “Men were reclaimed and restored as well.”

It’s an important message today as we contend with growing homeless populations and numbers of people in crisis.

From July 2014 through June 2015, Goodwill Hawaii assisted more than 11,000 people statewide with job training and placement programs.

This article originated from Star Advertiser written by Nadine Kam and published on April 2, 2016.